being green



Ask me anything  
Reblogged from fuckyeahspeechanddebate
Reblogged from loosetoon

shortformblog:

floppyhump:

invocationwithin:

loosetoon:

Early 70’s behind the scenes of Sesame Street with the Muppets.

THIS IS THE BEST PHOTO SET I HAVE EVER ENCOUNTERED. 

Love!

The top pic, featuring an orange Oscar the Grouch, is literally the best of the bunch.

(via teencenterspl)

Reblogged from simplypotterheads

Happy 7th birthday, Deathly Hallows!

(Source: simplypotterheads, via heyteenbookshey)

Reblogged from somethingsavage
medi-dat:

typette:

starsinhiseyes:

onyeplaysdrums:

hyrulians:

somethingsavage:

Rain-bros

I fucking love this.

I watched this for like 5 minutes

You guys realize that the length of their stride is indicative of that color’s wavelength right- red being the longest visible and blue one of the shortest. 

oh my god you’re right, of course you’re rightwhat a cute way to explain such things


they should do this in schools

medi-dat:

typette:

starsinhiseyes:

onyeplaysdrums:

hyrulians:

somethingsavage:

Rain-bros

I fucking love this.

I watched this for like 5 minutes

You guys realize that the length of their stride is indicative of that color’s wavelength right- red being the longest visible and blue one of the shortest. 

oh my god you’re right, of course you’re right

what a cute way to explain such things

they should do this in schools

(via michealcliffordscupcake)

Reblogged from maggie-stiefvater

fullmetaloptimist said: OK I'll take the bait -- how fucked up is Kavinsky REALLY? I'm expecting at least an 5 on the Richter scale of heartbreak.

maggie-stiefvater:

Okay, I’ll take the bait back, because I’m young and crotchety.

Note, spoilers for Dream Thieves will abound.

SPOILERS

SPOILERS

SPOILERS

SPOILING THINGS

Readers can interpret the events of the book in all sorts of ways, obviously, but here are things that happen canonically in The Dream Thieves:

  • Kavinsky drugs his mother without her knowledge
  • Kavinsky pursues Ronan with multiple text messages and gifts that indicate he has observed Ronan closely — i.e., copies of bracelets Ronan always wears and Ronan’s driver’s license
  • Kavinsky generally calls Ronan either gay or a girl
  • Kavinsky is seen once with a girl, who he calls “bitch”
  • Kavinsky has at least one dead companion who he dreamed a perfectly obedient replacement for — it is heavily implied that Kavinsky was somehow responsible for the guy’s death.
  • Kavinsky claims to have killed his own father (but this is debatable, as Kavinsky clearly is a liar)
  • Kavinsky tries to get Ronan to give up his friends
  • Kavinsky touches Ronan’s head, taps Ronan’s teeth with a pen, leaves stuff at Ronan’s home when he knows he won’t be there
  • Kavinsky gives Ronan a drug that renders Ronan immobile and barely conscious and then, while Ronan is helpless — and only then — sensually touches Ronan’s body (Ronan tells himself this might be a dream)
  • Ronan tells Kavinsky that they will never be an item, but Kavinsky keeps texting him
  • Kavinsky tells Ronan that consent is overrated (which echoes him continuously stepping into Ronan’s space without permission)
  • Kavinsky ultimately grows frustrated that Ronan will not give in, kidnaps Ronan’s brother, drugs him, and stuffs him in the trunk of a car to provoke a reaction from Ronan.

Here are other things that are canonical:

  • Kavinsky is a scary, terrible predator
  • Kavinsky has a very logical backstory that leads him to this place
  • Kavinsky chooses to be led to this place

Here are other, other things, also canonical:

  • Kavinsky can pull things from his dreams, has an absent (possibly dead) father, and an absent (largely useless) mother
  • Ronan can pull things from his dreams, has an absent (definitely dead) father, and an absent (largely useless) mother

I very much enjoyed writing Kavinsky — as a character, he challenged and delighted me. And I really wanted him to challenge and delight readers. One of the main ideas I’m exploring as I write the Raven Cycle is the question: how much are you a product of your upbringing? And can you overcome the terrible parts of it to become something better? All of the characters engage with these questions, which I find fiendishly interesting in real life. Kavinsky and Ronan both get the same set of circumstances and handle them in very different ways. It’s a choice.

So do I like Kavinsky? Out of all the characters I have ever written, he is one of my favorites.* Top four, probably. Or five, since four is an ugly number. But he’s a terrible person, more terrible because he chose it every. step. of. the. way. A logical backstory is not justification for trampling over consent, for kidnapping, for harassment.

Otherwise Adam would be justified in hitting Blue when he was angry, because he was hit by his father.

Kavinsky’s scale on the Richter scale of heartbreak? I’ll give him a solid 9, where 10 = absolutely zero evidence of desire to change.

These are all of my thoughts on Kavinsky. Your mileage may vary.

*ETA: I mean, people: I painted my car like his.

Reblogged from bookriot
catagator:

bookriot:

Get ready for your TBR to explode. Here’s a nice, thick list of LGBTQ reading for any occasion.

This booklist is so good. SO good. 

catagator:

bookriot:

Get ready for your TBR to explode. Here’s a nice, thick list of LGBTQ reading for any occasion.

This booklist is so good. SO good. 

Reblogged from weneeddiversebooks
weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you liked Matched by Allie Condie, try Tankborn by Karen Sandler because both books feature dystopian stories with strong female main characters. Cassia in Matched and Kayla in Tankborn both must fight against an oppressive society for the right to choose their own life.

weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you liked Matched by Allie Condie, try Tankborn by Karen Sandler because both books feature dystopian stories with strong female main characters. Cassia in Matched and Kayla in Tankborn both must fight against an oppressive society for the right to choose their own life.

Reblogged from diversityinya

diversityinya:

Notable Novels for Teens About the Arab World

By Elsa Marston

Abdel-Fattah, Randa. Where the Streets Had a Name (Scholastic 2010). Palestine, MG/YA. On a secret mission of mercy, a girl makes her way—strictly forbidden without permission from Israeli authorities—from her village into Jerusalem. [Also see this author’s books about Arab immigrants in Australia: Does My Head Look Big in This? andTen things I Hate About Me. Both have appealing teen voice.]

Al-Maria, Sophia. The Girl Who Fell to Earth (Harper Perennial 2012). Arabian Peninsula and Egypt, YA. The daughter of a mixed marriage spends time with her father’s family in a Gulf State, tries to reconcile her two radically different heritages.

Barakat, Ibtisam. Tasting the Sky: A Palestinian Childhood (Kroupa/Farrar Straus Giroux 2007). Palestine, MG/YA. Memoir of a young girl set in a time of war and displacement, but revealing solid family experience.

Carmi, Daniella. Samir and Yonatan (Levine/Scholastic 2000). Israel/Palestinians, MG/YA. A Palestinian boy being treated in an Israeli hospital relates to the children and medical staff.

Carter, Anne Laurel. The Shepherd’s Granddaughter (Groundwood 2008). Palestine, MG/YA. In a rural village under attack from a nearby Israeli settlement, a young teenaged girl starts to broaden her horizons.

Clinton, Cathryn. A Stone in My Hand (Candlewick 2002). Palestine, MG/YA. During an outbreak of violence, a young girl in Gaza copes with loss: her father’s death and her brother’s participation in the insurrection.

Laird, Elizabeth. A Little Piece of Ground (Haymarket 2006; originally Macmillan UK 2003). Palestine, MG/YA. A boy defies Israeli-imposed curfew in his efforts to claim a place to play soccer.

Nye, Naomi Shihab. Habibi (Simon & Schuster 1997). Palestine, MG/YA. An Arab-American girl visits her father’s natal village in Palestine, under occupation, and absorbs experiences both exhilarating and distressing.

Marsden, Carolyn. The White Zone (CarolRhoda 2012). Iraq, MG. Two boy cousins cope with the sectarian strife that separates them during the fighting in Baghdad.

Marston, Elsa. Santa Claus in Baghdad and Other Stories About Teens in the Arab World (Indiana University Press 2008). Several countries, MG/YA. Young teens in eight contrasting Arab societies face universal challenges of adolescence; the most adult story in subject matter is “Honor” (Jordan).

Perera, Anna. The Glass Collector (Whitman 2011). Egypt, YA. Valuable chiefly because of its setting in the “trash-collectors community” in Cairo.

* * *

elsamarston

With an M.A. in international affairs from Harvard University in hand, Elsa Marston attended the American University of Beirut on a Rotary Foundation Fellowship. Sojourns in different countries, especially Lebanon, Egypt, and Tunisia, have helped inspire Elsa’a work as a children’s/YA author and specialist in literature about the region. Her most recent books are a YA biography of a remarkable Arab hero, The Compassionate Warrior: Abd el-Kader of Algeria (Wisdom Tales 2013), and Santa Claus in Baghdad and Other Stories About Teens in the Arab World (Indiana University Press, 2008), a collection of stories set in different Arab societies, focusing on growing-up experiences that young Americans can relate to. A picture book about post-civil war Lebanon, The Olive Tree, is forthcoming in 2014.  Her website is www.elsamarston.com.

(via teenlibrariantoolbox)

Reblogged from joereid
Reblogged from spencerfan